39 fascinating pictures that show the M4 and Severn Bridge being built

These wonderful pictures show then modern semi-detached homes being shored up above the Brynglas tunnel in 1966 and the last pieces of the first Severn Bridge being lifted into place

Chances are you won’t remember a Wales without the M4 motorway and Severn crossings.

But these pictures show the years when both were built.

The fascinating pictures show what were then modern semi-detached homes being shored up above the Brynglas tunnel in 1966.

They show the last pieces of the first Severn Bridge being lifted into place in the mid-1960s.

And they reveal the mouth of the Severn with no bridge in place and just the first signs of work beginning.

There’s also the old Severn Ferry during its last days – it ceased when the bridge began carrying cars.

Prime Minister James Callaghan drives a tractor along the St Mellons to Tredegar Park section of the M4 – 25th October 1977

Before the M4 Severn Bridge was built, there was no road crossing of the Severn south of Gloucester.

Cars crossing between South Wales and southern England had to use the A40, travelling considerably out of the way to the north and getting frequently congested at Gloucester, or use the Severn ferry, not a particularly well used option.

The first Severn Bridge was opened in 1966 to replace the ferry service crossing from Aust to Beachley. The new bridge provided a direct link for the M4 motorway into Wales.

The bridge gets lit up for around the clock working – 24th March 1964

The second crossing was opened in 1996 as traffic became too much for the first bridge.

The first section of the M4, in Chiswick in west London, opened in 1959. The first Welsh stretch – which stretched from junction 18 east of Bristol to west of Newport and incorporated the Severn Bridge – opened in 1966.

The Welsh stretch was completed in 1993 when the Briton Ferry bridge opened.

Full Article & More Pictures at http://www.walesonline.co.uk/lifestyle/nostalgia/39-fascinating-pictures-show-m4-8781406

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